Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships





Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships

Sole Proprietorship





Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships - The majority of all small business start out as Sole Proprietorship. These firms are owned by one person, usually the individual who has day-to-day responsibility for running the business. Sole proprietors own all the assets of the business and the profits generated by it. They also assume complete responsibility for any of its liabilities or debts. In the view of the law and the public, you are one in the same with the business.Currently used by more than 75 percent of all businesses, it is often the suggested way for a new business that does not carry great personal liability threats. The owner simply needs to secure the necessary licenses, tax identification numbers and certifications in his or her name, and you are now in business.

Major advantages that differentiate the sole proprietorship from the other legal forms are (1) the ease with which it can be started, (2) the owner's freedom to make decisions, and (3) the distribution of profits (owner takes all).

Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships - Advantages

  • Easiest and least expensive form of ownership to organize.
  • Sole proprietors are in complete control, and within the parameters of the law, may make decisions as they see fit.
  • Sole proprietors receive all income generated by the business to keep or reinvest.
  • Profits from the business flow-through directly to the owner's personal tax return.
  • The business is easy to dissolve, if desired.
Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships - Disadvantages
  • Sole proprietors have unlimited liability and are legally responsible for all debts against the business. Their business and personal assets are at risk.
  • May be at a disadvantage in raising funds and are often limited to using funds from personal savings or consumer loans.
  • May have a hard time attracting high-caliber employees, or those that are motivated by the opportunity to own a part of the business.
  • Some employee benefits such as owner's medical insurance premiums are not directly deductible from business income (only partially deductible as an adjustment to income).
  • A corporation pays 15% federal income tax on taxable income up to $50,000; 25% tax on income from $50,001 - $75,000; 34% tax on income from $75,001 - $100,000; 39% tax on income from $100,001 - $335,000; and 34% tax on income over $335,000.
  • A sole proprietor who filed a federal income tax return under the status of married, filing jointly, would pay 15% federal income tax on taxable income up to $35,800; 28% tax on income from $35,801 to 86,500; and 31% tax on income over $86,501.
  • Sale/Transfer of All or Part of the Business. The sole proprietor can transfer the business only by the sale of business assets. This means it is more difficult to have someone buy into the business, and there are potential tax consequences of converting a sole proprietorship to a corporation or a Limited Liability Company rather than starting out with a durable form of business entity.

Federal Tax Forms for Sole Proprietorship

  • Form 1040: Individual Income Tax Return
  • Schedule C: Profit or Loss from Business (or Schedule C-EZ)
  • Schedule SE: Self-Employment Tax
  • Form 1040-ES: Estimated Tax for Individuals
  • Form 4562: Depreciation and Amortization
  • Form 8829: Expenses for Business Use of your Home



Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships



Partnerships



In a Business Partnership,, two or more people share ownership of a single business. Like sole proprietorships, the laws do not distinguish between the business and its owners. The Partners should have a legal agreement that sets forth how decisions will be made, profits will be shared, disputes will be resolved, how future partners will be admitted to the partnership, how partners can be bought out, or what steps will be taken to dissolve the partnership when needed;. Its difficult to think about a "break-up" when the business is just getting started, but many partnerships split up at crisis times and unless there is a defined process, there will be problems. They also must decide up front how much time and capital each will contribute.

Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships



Advantages of a Partnership

  • Partnerships are relatively easy to establish; however time should be invested in developing the partnership agreement.
  • With more than one owner, the ability to raise funds may be increased.
  • The profits from the business flow directly through to the partners' personal tax returns.
  • Prospective employees may be attracted to the business if given the incentive to become a partner.
  • The business usually will benefit from partners who have complementary skills.

Disadvantages of a Partnership

  • Partners are jointly and individually liable for the actions of the other partners.
  • Profits must be shared with others.
  • Since decisions are shared, disagreements can occur.
  • Some employee benefits are not deductible from business income on tax returns.
  • The partnership may have a limited life; it may end upon the withdrawal or death of a partner.




Sole Proprietorship vs Partnerships

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